5 September 2008

Hitler Facts (Archive)

Hitler Facts is developing alongside Did Hitler Eat Strawberry Cake  is the first in a series of 
books taking a light-hearted and imaginative look at tyranny.  The series starts with with one of history’s most frightening tyrants Adolf Hitler.

Written for a popular audience, Did Hitler Eat Strawberry Cake is peppered with interesting facts and nuggets of information that are communicated to its audience in a range of publishing styles.  There are stories written in the third person narrative, short essays considering key arguments surrounding Hitler and candid discussions about his personality and character.  The essays and stories are softened with a large number of images and explanatory box-outs, which are also tempered by interlocking chapters containing witty and informative Top Tens, and annotated pictorial guides to Hitler.  While Did Hitler Eat Strawberry Cake is emphatically History Light, the research upon which it is grounded is extensive and is derived from: distinguished biography, academic journals and historical and media archives. Did Hitler Eat Strawberry Cake is written in jargon free language that helps maintain a friendly, but authoritative tone of voice.  The aim of  the approach is to convey a sound and trusted working knowledge of the relevant histories, without making the author sound too much cleverer than the reader.

The book has also been designed so that the reader may dip into it at any point and immediately find something of interest.  Did Hitler Eat Strawberry Cake presents aspects of Hitler and the surrounding history, in ways that an academic, or heavier biographical approach, would fail to communicate to a popular audience.  Future titles take a fresh look at: Gadaffi, Bin laden, Hussein, Amin, Pol Pot, Stalin, Henry the VIII and Genghis Khan.

There are extracts from Did Hitler Eat Strawberry Cake for you here. If you are an Agent or Publisher who wants to read more from the book, contact the author and he'll get back to you.  
View or Download sample chapter Hitler in Prison...


Hitler on the web: Did Hitler Eat Strawberry Cake featured in the Writer's Guardian

HITLER HOMEWORK | WAS THE TREATY OF VERSAILLES THE REASON WHY HITLER CAME TO POWER?

How the Treaty of Versailles helped Hitler
The Treaty of Versailles, agreed by the German government and the Allies in 1919, stated that Germany had to pay the Allies $33 billion in compensation for the damage caused during the First World War. The economic and social consequences of having to repay this debt  made the  German people poorer and  caused them to look to new leaders like Hitler to stand up to challenge  the government. 
Other reasons that helped Hitler to power
  • Hitler was a very persuasive speaker.  For example, imprisononed in 1923 for trying to overthrow the Bavarian Government in Munich, he persuaded most of the prison staff to convert to the Nazism.
  • Hitler’s view on the German Nation was more in line with the peoples than the ruling Weimar Government he despised.  Hitler accused them of giving up in the First World War and blamed them for economic ruin as they failed to stand up to the allies after the war. 
  • Hitler was awarded the Iron Cross in the first world war for bravery which added to his image of being loyal to Germany.
  • Effective propaganda orchestrated by the Nazi party.
  • The powers of the police (SS) was enhanced to protect Hitler from opposition. 
Opinion & Conclusion
Hitler came to power in Germany on a policy of promising of reverse the decline of Germany caused by having to repay a massive debt to the Allies. In my opinion it is highly unlikely that Hitler, or the Nazi Party that he led, would have come to power in Germany if it had not been for the negative economic and social consequences of the Treaty of Versailles.  However, there were also some other personal reasons, like Hitler’s effective public speaking skills, loyalty to Germany and  the support of the Nazi Party, that contributed to his rise to power.   In summary, the negative consequences of the Versailles Treaty helped Hitler persuade the Nazi Party and the German people, that the Weimar government that signed the treaty in 1919 had to be removed and that his radical plan could restore Germany to its former glory. 


Hitler Facts
Hitler Facts is developing alongside Did Hitler Eat Strawberry Cake  is the first in a series of books taking a light-hearted and imaginative look at tyranny. The series starts with with one of history’s most frightening tyrants Adolf Hitler.
Written for a popular audience, Did Hitler Eat Strawberry Cake is peppered with interesting facts and nuggets of information that are communicated to its audience in a range of publishing styles.  There are stories written in the third person narrative, short essays considering key arguments surrounding Hitler and candid discussions about his personality and character.  The essays and stories are softened with a large number of images and explanatory box-outs, which are also tempered by interlocking chapters containing witty and informative Top Tens, and annotated pictorial guides to Hitler.  While Did Hitler Eat Strawberry Cake is emphatically History Light, the research upon which it is grounded is extensive and is derived from: distinguished biography, academic journals and historical and media archives. Did Hitler Eat Strawberry Cake is written in jargon free language that helps maintain a friendly, but authoritative tone of voice.  The aim of  the approach is to convey a sound and trusted working knowledge of the relevant histories, without making the author sound too much cleverer than the reader.
The book has also been designed so that the reader may dip into it at any point and immediately find something of interest.  Did Hitler Eat Strawberry Cake presents aspects of Hitler and the surrounding history, in ways that an academic, or heavier biographical approach, would fail to communicate to a popular audience.  Future titles take a fresh look at: Gadaffi, Bin laden, Hussein, Amin, Pol Pot, Stalin, Henry the VIII and Genghis Khan.
There are extracts from Did Hitler Eat Strawberry Cake for you here. If you are an Agent or Publisher who wants to read more from the book, contact the author and he'll get back to you.
  
View or Download sample chapter Hitler in Prison...
Hitler in Prison

Hitler on the web: Did Hitler Eat Strawberry Cake featured in the Writer's Guardian

Directed by Leni Riefenstahl, The Triumph of the Will  is Nazi propaganda par excellence. Filmed in Nuremberg during the Nazi Party Congress in 1934 this hour and three quarter rant is Nazi-party idolatry at its very worst.  Unsurprisingly, Hitler commissioned the movie to exhibit the magnificence of the Third Reich. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GHs2coAzLJ8
Having won critical acclaim for its state of the art cinematic techniques and striking visuals, Riefenstahl’s The Triumph of Will is regarded by some as one of the best films ever made.  I wouldn’t go that far, but it’s certainly one to watch for anyone puzzled about how the Nazi party managed to fool the German people into allowing to Hitler dismantle their democracy within eighteen months.
Read another interesting fact about Hitler and the The Triumph of Will.

The Triumph of Will is also No. 5 in our Top Ten Films about Hitler . You'll find it in Part V of Did Hitler Eat Strawberry Cake?

CONTENTS | WHAT'S IN DID HITLER EAT STRAWBERRY CAKE?

Hitler the man 
This section considers what lay behind the public face of Hitler?  What were Hitler’s mum and dad like?   Did Hitler’s dog Blondi sleep with Hitler in his Berlin bunker? And what did a bunch of American psychiatrists make of Hitler?
Hitler the thinker
What’s behind Hitler’s ideas?  How did Nietzsche and Hitler’s obsession with the occult find their way into Nazi policy?  Why did Hitler write Mein Kampf? And what did Hitler think was so bad about eating meat? 

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olksauto – The People’s car

Hitler’s idea of making a car for the working classes was revolutionary in 1930s Germany.  The Volksauto (later renamed the Volkswagen, meaning “the people’s car”) was built at a price ordinary people could afford.  Hitler’s decision to put the car into production also gave the German motor industry, that was struggling at the time, a much needed boost.  A few weeks after Hitler’s order to build the Volksauto was given, the flagging motor trade started to recover.  Unsurprisingly, 80 years on, what today we know as the Volkswagen Beetle, remains as popular, as ever.  Thanks Adolf.
PS. AGENTS & PUBLISHERS There's is more about Volksauto in the full submission.  


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Did Hitler Eat Strawberry Cake? is full of interesting facts about Hitler...
Interesting fact: In Landsberg prison Hitler didn’t just read history, politics, economics, and sundry racist works, he also brushed up on his hobby - occult studies. 
Interesting fact: One of the Nazis killed on the 1923 march on Munich was Hitler’s bodyguard Ulrich Graf who heroically took a volley of bullets meant for Hitler.  How different the course of history may have been if Hitler had taken the bullets instead.
Interesting fact:  During The Triumph of Will  Hitler does not mention anything for which he would later become infamous.   Watch out for the scene where the Führer’s motorcade stops for a little girl to present Hitler with a bouquet of flowers. Chilling.

Here you'll find facts about Hitler's life, how he interpreted history, viewed race, and his political aims.  Difficult questions will also be tackled such as how did Hitler use anti-Semitism to advance his political career? and how, as  a political leader of a democracy he was Adolf Hitler able to manipulate the political system to become the absolute ruler of Germany.


Ahead of the 70th anniversary of International Holocaust Remembrance Day the President of the European Jewish Congress, Moshe Kantor, compared Islamic extremism to Nazism.
“Yes, in certain vital aspects jihadism is very close to Nazism, One could say that they are two facets of the same evil.” Kantor said. Source The Jerusalem Post

A painting of Munich City Hall believed to be one of Hitler's delicate watercolours has been sold in Germany for 130,000 euros, or £103,000.
While experts don't normally rate Hitler as an artist, the Nuremberg aution house selling the piece told journalists that they had received interest from four continents.

A fantastic UK history resource that focuses on the world's most significant historical figures.  Here's the BBC's version of German history, who feature lots of clips from Hitler buffs.  There's a nice image of Hitler giving the Nazi salute at a 1939 rally to.

Member of the Danish Nazi party in the late 1930s, Dr Carl Værnet specialised in hormone research; including treatments to “cure” homosexuality.'
"After Denmark was occupied by the Nazis, few patients visited Værnet’s clinic because of his pro-Hitler sympathies. This prompted him to approach the Nazis, who were well known for their hatred of gay people and their bid to “eliminate the perverted world of the homosexual”. Værnet met the chief Nazi doctor, Reichsarzt-SS Ernst Grawitz, who proposed that he research the treatment of homosexuality on behalf of the SS..." Peter Tacthell said. 

This resource is part of the American-Israeli Cooperation Initiative and a must read for anyone that wants to understand how Hitler and the Nazis have impacted on Jewish history and culture.